Entering the “sociological imagination”

March 16, 2011 Comments Off on Entering the “sociological imagination”

Today I discovered that my article in The New York Times was incorporated into a college course on gender.  I’m going to email the professor and see if she’s teaching the class again.  I’d love to be a guest speaker!

S O C I O L O G Y O F G E N D E R

Course Description: The course will begin with a review of scholarly thinking about sex and gender and includes an overview of economic, social and cultural changes that have modified the traditional definitions of femininity and masculinity in contemporary society. We will explore how we are socialized to occupy gender roles and how gender is built into the structures, institutions, and ideologies of social life. We will investigate the gendered underpinnings of various social realms including: the personal realm of the body; the familial realm of marriage and the domestic division of labor; the economic realm of work within and outside the paid labor force; and the political realms of the state and society. Throughout the course, we will examine closely the experience of men, women, and those who challenge these dualistic gender categories.

Course Objectives:
• To develop the “sociological imagination”—the ability to apply a critical perspective to view yourself and your various social worlds with a greater understanding of individual, group and societal processes as they relate to gender issues.
• To master the ability to pose theoretical questions and engage with current debates in the field.
• To develop written and verbal skills for developing ideas, exchanging ideas with others, and presenting these ideas to a broader audience with confidence in your abilities to articulate and interpret your own experiences and to empower you to take action as agents of personal and social change.

Week 6 Bodies and Boundaries:

Thursday, October 14:  Gili Warsett. September 10, 2010. “An Anatomy of a Breakup.” New York Times.

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

What’s this?

You are currently reading Entering the “sociological imagination” at giliwarsett.

meta

%d bloggers like this: